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Posts Tagged ‘abandoned’

The Fujiyama Garden Hotel: Image Tour

Here are some photos taken at the very location of the former Yamanaka Lake Hotel and comments by our official Haikyo & Urban Explorer, Wye-Khe Kwok, who visited the area last weekend.

It was a strange sense of disappointment and awe that crept over me as I walked up the freshly-laid concrete driveway of what is now a former Haikyo site. As efficient as the Japanese machine is when it comes to cleanups (evident in their handling of train jumpers), the whole concrete shell had been wiped clean and renovated up into a pretty slick and grand resort hotel in less than a year.

It so happened to be the opening ceremony when I walked in through the glass archway entrance with cap and backpack, sticking out amongst the suits and Kimonos like a rusty nail in a pile of shiny tacks.

The bar was open, blue note jazz wafting about with the odor of new carpet and glue, and the gift shop displayed the usual generic assortment of overpriced but useless souvenirs and Hello Kitty trinkets.
So it is with great regret, that we commit what was once a great concrete skeleton Haikyo to the category of just-another-boring-hotel-by-the-lake hotel.

(Click on the thumbnails to enlarge image.)

As you could see, it’s no longer abandoned and they have high hopes to make it a one-stop-sightseeing for anyone wishing to visit glorious Mt. Fuji.

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Alex Kawano.
Official HE Blog Author

Keishin Hospital: Demolition

The Keishin Hospital, located in the Kanagawa prefecture, once widely known for being “haunted” and the site of petty crime has been bought by the Atsugi City Government and is set to be demolished and have its land redeveloped into a park by 2011.

The news was announced on April 23, when the Atsugi City Goverment bought the entire property for ¥12.63 million with plans to change the image of the entire site into a place where the local community can feel safe and comfortable to live.

Access to the public has been severely restricted since then, with high fences and security cameras protecting the perimeters. Just to be clear on this topic, the access to the public was never legally permitted.

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Alex Kawano.
Official HE Blog Author